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DAMKINA - GODDESSES OF NIBIRU
Romulo Royo
PAINTING
Acrylic and oil on paper.
Measure of 100 x 70 cm. (39.37 x 27.55 in.)
Year of realization 2015.
Signed in the bottom right of the piece.
It belongs to the series Goddesses of Nibiru, reflects the game of the myth and reality. The delicacy and strength represented by the female figure. Captures beautiful, enigmatic and sometimes veiled factions, as if it were a dream or illusion.

The tones are clear and contrasted, going from a light skin and background to shades almost of black, producing a highly-balanced contrast. The brushwork is expressive without affecting the pearly skin and serene posture. This fluency in his strokes is reminiscent of abstract art, in contrast with a totally figurative, delicate style of painting. Once again, Romulo gives us a piece in which we can appreciate matter, glazing and fluent brushwork, at the same time as there is a definition and representation of beauty. It is not at all easy to be able to find all these elements together.
 
Painting has always seemed torn between an inward and an outward gaze: between vision and perception, between our dreams and the concrete, highly politicized conditions framing our comprehension of the world and what it might become. Today is no different. After a period in which the medium has been dominated by process-based abstraction, the figure – and representation with it – is ascendant again. But, if the 1990s and 2000s saw artists such as John Currin distorting classical form while others, following Gerhard Richter, mimicked photography, today’s figuration displays a distinctly different character. Gone, for the most part, are the echoes of old masters; gone, too, are the blurs of photorealism. What takes their place, instead, is a highly idiosyncratic approach filtered through pronounced affect, comic-book and sci-fi aesthetics, dreamy narratives and an eagerness to engage with our political moment without forfeiting the sensuousness of the medium.
David Geers (Sotheby's)
 

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DEATH OF THE FIFTH SUN
Luis Royo
PAINTING
Watercolor, acrylic with airbrush and oil on paper.
Painted surface 64 x 48 cm ( 25.19 x 18.89 in. ) in a format of 76 x 60 cm. ( 29.92 x 23.62 in. )
Year of realization 1988.
Signed on bottom right of the piece.
Published on the inside of the author's book Women, page 70.
Cover for the novel "Death of the fifth sun" by the writer Robert Somerlott, published in 1988 by Tor Books (USA).

Painting has always seemed torn between an inward and an outward gaze: between vision and perception, between our dreams and the concrete, highly politicized conditions framing our comprehension of the world and what it might become. Today is no different. After a period in which the medium has been dominated by process-based abstraction, the figure – and representation with it – is ascendant again. But, if the 1990s and 2000s saw artists such as John Currin distorting classical form while others, following Gerhard Richter, mimicked photography, today’s figuration displays a distinctly different character. Gone, for the most part, are the echoes of old masters; gone, too, are the blurs of photorealism. What takes their place, instead, is a highly idiosyncratic approach filtered through pronounced affect, comic-book and sci-fi aesthetics, dreamy narratives and an eagerness to engage with our political moment without forfeiting the sensuousness of the medium.
David Geers (Sotheby's)

Adventure can have tiny feet, so it can walk stealthily. It can be ugly and strike panic into the heart, it can even have foul breath, but it never has tiny lungs. Adventure needs a big rib cage and the ability to blow hard, because adventure, above all, is about breath. At times an icy breeze, at others a warm, balmy wind. But always a breath of fresh air. With no lungs, or with lungs that can't take a deep breath, adventure can't move. And an adventure that can't move becomes boring.
Luis Royo

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MADRE TIERRA
Luis Royo
STUDY 1
Watercolor, acrylic with airbrush on paper.
Painted surface 32 x 16 cm ( 12.59 x 6.29 in. ) in a format of 40 x 24.3 cm. ( 15.74 x 9.56 in. )
Year of realization 2002.
One of the versions made for the cover of the album Mother Earth for band Avalanch.
Published on the inside of the author's book Visions, page 47. Edited in several languages and distributed internationaly.

Painting has always seemed torn between an inward and an outward gaze: between vision and perception, between our dreams and the concrete, highly politicized conditions framing our comprehension of the world and what it might become. Today is no different. After a period in which the medium has been dominated by process-based abstraction, the figure – and representation with it – is ascendant again. But, if the 1990s and 2000s saw artists such as John Currin distorting classical form while others, following Gerhard Richter, mimicked photography, today’s figuration displays a distinctly different character. Gone, for the most part, are the echoes of old masters; gone, too, are the blurs of photorealism. What takes their place, instead, is a highly idiosyncratic approach filtered through pronounced affect, comic-book and sci-fi aesthetics, dreamy narratives and an eagerness to engage with our political moment without forfeiting the sensuousness of the medium.
David Geers (Sotheby's)

"In the heart of the forest, privileged place among the various symbols of nature, the great dark drawer where myths are born"

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DEAD MOON - 034
Luis Royo
STUDY
Graphite on tracing paper.
Painted surface of 17.5 x 25 cm. ( 6.88 x 9.84 in. ) in a format of 27.3 x 45 cm. ( 10.74 x 17.71 in. )
Year of realization 2009.
Signed on the bottom right of the piece.
Work made for the serie Dead Moon.

Painting has always seemed torn between an inward and an outward gaze: between vision and perception, between our dreams and the concrete, highly politicized conditions framing our comprehension of the world and what it might become. Today is no different. After a period in which the medium has been dominated by process-based abstraction, the figure – and representation with it – is ascendant again. But, if the 1990s and 2000s saw artists such as John Currin distorting classical form while others, following Gerhard Richter, mimicked photography, today’s figuration displays a distinctly different character. Gone, for the most part, are the echoes of old masters; gone, too, are the blurs of photorealism. What takes their place, instead, is a highly idiosyncratic approach filtered through pronounced affect, comic-book and sci-fi aesthetics, dreamy narratives and an eagerness to engage with our political moment without forfeiting the sensuousness of the medium.
David Geers (Sotheby's)

In the morning, her rooms were filled with her personal gossips who discovered and pointed out to her in which corner of the city the heaviest and healthiest young man was, and her personal guard did not take long to bring him. But the encounter always had the same outcome: the anonymous young man was taken to her bed full of energy and his eyes were lit seeing the naked white skin of the princess.
Dead Moon

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EL SÍMBOLO HA MUERTO
Luis Royo
PAINTING
Watercolor, acrylic with airbrush and oil on paper.
Painted surface 22 x 36.3 cm ( 8.66 x 14.29 in. ) in a format of 36 x 50 cm. ( 14.17 x 19.68 in. )
Year of realization 1994.
Signed on bottom right of the piece.

Painting has always seemed torn between an inward and an outward gaze: between vision and perception, between our dreams and the concrete, highly politicized conditions framing our comprehension of the world and what it might become. Today is no different. After a period in which the medium has been dominated by process-based abstraction, the figure – and representation with it – is ascendant again. But, if the 1990s and 2000s saw artists such as John Currin distorting classical form while others, following Gerhard Richter, mimicked photography, today’s figuration displays a distinctly different character. Gone, for the most part, are the echoes of old masters; gone, too, are the blurs of photorealism. What takes their place, instead, is a highly idiosyncratic approach filtered through pronounced affect, comic-book and sci-fi aesthetics, dreamy narratives and an eagerness to engage with our political moment without forfeiting the sensuousness of the medium.
David Geers (Sotheby's)

Mixing love with war, beauty with risk, seduction with challenge, passion with death, makes for a poison as sweet as it is explosive.
Luis Royo

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